Special Features

  • An abrasion resistant glove protects the hand from contact with rough surfaces. Abrasion resistance is defined by glove material and thickness, and may be improved with the use of exterior coatings.
  • A chemical resistant glove helps protect the hand from certain chemicals. Chemical resistance varies by glove material. When selecting a glove with chemical resistance, consult the manufacturer’s guide.
  • A cut resistant glove protects the hand from blades and sharp instruments. Cut resistance is defined by glove material and thickness, and may be improved with the use of certain exterior coatings.
  • A disposable glove is intended for one-time use and should be discarded when it shows signs of wear or after the task is complete.
  • A latex free glove contains no latex and has a reduced likelihood of causing an allergic reaction.
  • A powdered glove is coated with cornstarch, also called donning powder, on the inside of the glove to make it easier to put on and to help keep gloves from sticking to each other in the box. A powdered glove leaves a residue on the hand, and donning powder can irritate skin and wounds.
  • A powder free gloves is less likely than a powdered glove to spread allergens and bacteria and to cause irritation to skin and wounds. However, a powder-free glove is more likely to stick to other gloves in the box and can be more difficult to put on, particularly in wet environments. A powder-free glove does not leave a residue on the hand.
  • A puncture resistant glove protects the hand from pointed objects such as pins and needles. Puncture resistance is defined by the glove material and thickness, and may be improved with the use of exterior coatings.
  • A silicone free glove contains no silicone and has a reduced likelihood of causing an allergic reaction.
  • A sterile glove reduces or eliminates the risk of dirt, bacteria, and other contaminants inadvertently carried into an aseptic environment.