Shank Type

  • Annular Cutter Shank

    Annular Cutter shanks have two Weldon flats ground into the shank at a 90-degree angle. They are commonly used with magnetic-base drills.

  • Hex Shank

    Hex shanks have flats ground into the shank to resemble the shape of a hexagon. They can be gripped more firmly than a standard round shank bit, reducing slippage. This style works well with quick-change and standard chucks 1/4" and larger.

  • Morse Taper Shank

    Morse Taper shanks are tapered from one end to another. They fit into tool holders with the same taper. They allow efficient transmission of torque to the drill bit and provide accurate, centered placement in the tool holder. A tang at the end of the taper is used to eject the drill bit by pushing a drift-pin into the slot, which pushes the shank down and out.

  • Round Shanks

    Round shanks are the most common drill bit shank. They are usually the same size as the drill bit cutting diameter. This style fits into the widest range of tool holders.

  • Round with Flats

    Round with Flats shanks are round with flats along the sides, starting at the tip. They are usually the same size as the drill bit cutting diameter. The flats help reduce slippage and provide a secure fit in the tool holder. This style fits most tool holders and gives a more secure hold than a shank without flats.

  • Round with Square End Shanks

    Round with Square End shanks have a round shank with a square end. They are usually the same size as the drill bit cutting diameter. The square ends help reduce slippage and provide a secure fit in the tool holder. This style fits into large ratchet drills and gives a more secure hold than a shank without flats.

  • Round with Tang Shanks

    Round with Tang shanks have a round shank with a tang ground into the end of the shank. They are usually the same size as the drill bit cutting diameter. The tang helps reduce slippage and provides a secure fit in the tool holder. The tang at the end of the shank is used to eject the drill bit by pushing a drift-pin into the slot, which pushes the shank down and out.

  • Threaded Shanks

    Threaded shanks have threads on the opposite end of the drill from the cutting edges. These can be quickly threaded into drills or drill attachments. They are generally used in close center multiple spindle applications or portable angle drilling tools. The threads provide a secure fit in the tool holder. Some threaded bits adhere to NAS 965 standards used in the aerospace industry.

  • Weldon Shanks

    Weldon shanks have one or two flats ground into a portion of the sides and are commonly used in a tool holder with a set screw. This provides a secure hold in the tool holder and helps prevent slippage.

  • Whistle Notch Shanks

    Whistle Notch shanks have a flat ground into the sides with a slight taper toward the end of the shank. The notch prevents axial forces from pushing the tool into the tool holder under high pressure.