Wheels and Discs Type

  • Angle & die grinder wheels are typically used on the handheld power tools of the same name, and describe a broad category of abrasive wheels used for cutting, grinding, and sanding a wide range of materials.
  • Bench & pedestal grinding wheels are medium-to-large diameter wheels (5" and greater) often used for deburring and sharpening of parts and tools, and are typically used with large grinding machines of the same name. A bench grinder can rest on a workbench or other support. Pedestal grinders are larger, and rest on a pedestal on the floor.
  • Bristle discs are flexible molded discs with multiple thin abrasive fingers. They come in two styles, a radial style and a cup shaped style. The radial style looks like a disc or wheel with many fingers pointing out from the center, while the cup style looks more like a half of a ball, with the fingers pointing out perpendicular from the flat face. Multiples of the radial style can be stacked on the tool mandrel to cover more area at a time. Both styles are used for cleaning, polishing, and texturing. Bristle discs remove paint, adhesives, rust, heavy oxides, and surface contaminants from big areas, quickly and efficiently.
  • Cutoff wheels (also called parting wheels) are thin wheels used to cut through rebar, concrete, pipe, and many other materials. They are often used for fast cutting and high-rpm purposes and may be reinforced for additional strength. A cutoff wheel is frequently used with a right-angle grinder.
  • Fladder blades are flexible, slashed abrasive material that is formed into a circular shape with many individual abrasive strips and held together with a cloth loop. This is then wound around a pin assembly in the center of the wheel. They are used for blending and sanding on both flat and contoured surfaces, as well as deburring, brush-finishing, and polishing on metal surfaces.
  • Flap discs are constructed of many relatively small flaps of coated abrasive joined to a central backing plate. The flaps are oriented so that the abrasive is on the face of the disc. As the flaps wear, they expose the next layer of abrasive material below. This style of abrasive can be used to both grind and finish, helping to reduce the overall number of disc changes.
  • Flap wheels are similar to flap discs in that they are constructed of many coated abrasive flaps, but the flaps are oriented so that the wheel is used on its narrow edge. Flap wheels are used on flat and contoured surfaces to clean and finish a part.
  • Grinding discs are used for grinding and sanding metals, wood, and other materials. They are thinner than grinding wheels, and are made of coated abrasive.
  • OD grinding wheels include centerless grinding wheels, cylindrical grinding wheels, and feed regulating grinding wheels. OD grinding is when an object is ground on its exterior, for example, in cylindrical grinding where an object is held between centers, and the grinding wheel rotates in the same direction as the workpiece being ground.
  • Surface grinding wheels are thick wheels of bonded abrasive that are used for grinding flat materials, usually metals, to improve the finish. A surface grinding machine holds the wheel on a chuck over a reciprocating table (a table which moves relative to the wheel).
  • Sanding disc backing pads help hold the disc steady and attach it to a power tool. There are generally two styles, those used with a right angle grinder or die grinder and those used with an orbital sander. Use molded-rubber back-up pads on a grinder. Choose a hard pad for aggressive cutting, a medium pad for general-purpose applications, or a soft pad for contours and fine finishing work. Or, with a random orbital sander, choose a foam back-up pad to match the application. Foam pads can come in different combinations of shape and density for finer or more aggressive work. For example, choose a low profile for uniform contact with the work surface or a tapered edge for small contours or inside corners, soft density for 320 grit and finer sanding, and medium density for grits coarser than 320.
  • Sanding discs are round, typically flat pieces of coated abrasive used for sanding and finishing metals, wood, and other materials. Sanding discs are flexible enough that they are used with a backing pad (also called a back-up pad), sold separately.
  • Snagging wheels (also called fettling wheels) are foundry wheels named after the snagging process, which is removing mold marks and sand from a casting. However, these wheels are used for many other metalworking processes, such as removing weld beads, rough beveling, and surface preparation.
  • Tool post grinding wheels are mounted beside the spindle of a lathe to grind a part while both the abrasive and the workpiece are rotating. These wheels are generally bonded abrasives, and can be used on a wide variety of materials.
  • Tool room grinding wheels are used to sharpen cutting tools. These wheels are generally very tough or dimensionally stable, since they are used on hard or abrasive metals.