Screw Head Style

  • Binding

    Binding head screws are similar to those with pan heads; they are considered an older style and are commonly replaced by pan screws. Binding heads have a deeper slot and are slightly undercut under the head. They are often used for electrical work.

  • Binding
Undercut

    Binding undercut head screws are similar to pan heads, but they have a deeper drive slot, which spans the head diameter. The underside of the head is recessed. They are commonly used for electrical work.

  • Bugle

    Bugle screws  have a curved, inverted cone-shaped head, and a flat head surface with slightly rounded edges.

  • Button

    Button head screws are similar to standard pan head screws but have a curved top.

  • Cheese

    Cheese head screws have a thick cylindrical head with a deep slot for increased driving power.

  • Fillister

    Fillister head screws have a thick cylindrical head with a deep drive slot for higher levels of torque. The head is smaller than a round head.

  • Flange
Hex

    Flange hex head screws screws have an extra bearing surface between the top of the screw head and the body that provides an additional gripping strength. This flange area resembles a flat washer, with its semi-flat disc shape.

  • Flat

    Flat head screws are designed to fit flush to the surface when used with countersunk holes.

  • Flat 
Fillister

    Flat fillister screws are similar to fillister, but with a reduced head height.

  • Flat
Undercut

    Flat undercut screws have a countersunk, flat head with a cone-shaped bearing surface, and are undercut to a lower head height, allowing for a shallower countersink.

  • External
Hex

    Hex head screws are hexagonal shaped with a flat bearing surface.

  • Knurled

    Knurled head screws have ridges or grooves on the head, which are designed to be twisted into a tapped hole by hand, without using tools.

  • Low Head Socket 
Cap

    Low head socket cap screws have a head that is about half the size of a standard socket head. They are not recommended for high strength applications.

  • Modified
Truss

    Modified truss screws have an extra-wide, low profile dome, allowing for a wider load distribution. They have a slightly rounded top and rounded side edge.

  • Oval

    Oval head screws are tapered on the bottom like flat heads to fit flush in countersunk holes, but they have an oval top.

  • Oval
Undercut

    Oval undercut screws have a slightly domed, arched head that has an oval-shaped curve from the side view, and a round shape from the top view. The head is undercut to a lower head height, allowing for more thread length.  The base of the head is beveled towards the body.

  • Pan

    Pan head screws have a low, large cylindrical head with a high rounded top edge. This head type is often recommended to replace older head styles such as round, binding, or truss.

  • Round

    Round head screws have a dome shape. They are considered an older style and are commonly replaced by pan screws.

  • Socket
Cap

    Socket cap screws, also known as Allen head screws, have a recessed drive, and are commonly used when there is not enough clearance for a conventional wrench or socket. They are fastened with an Allen wrench, which is also called a hex wrench or hex key. 

  • Spade with
Shoulder

    Spade head screws (with shoulder) have an easy-to-grasp spade-shaped head, which allows for easy tightening and loosening by hand. The shoulder acts as a bearing surface.

  • Spade

    Spade head screws (without shoulder) have an easy-to-grasp spade shaped head, which allows for easy tightening and loosening by hand.

  • Square

    Square head screws have a square shaped, prominent head that is easy to access with a wrench or by hand, when more torque is needed.

  • Truss

    Truss head screws have an extra-wide lower-profile dome with a slightly rounded top.